1. Knowing geography and geography curriculum


1.2 Assist students to understand that geography draws from the physical sciences, the social sciences and the humanities.

Focus question:
  • How does geography connect the physical sciences, the social sciences and the humanities?
Further questions:
  • How comprehensively do you understand these connections?
  • How might you assist your students to make these connections?
Samples of practice

(a) Backdrop:
In this sample a student explains how his teacher changed his perspective of the subject – how he now understands that it involves much more than the use of coloured pencils or pens. Does the slide demonstrate the breadth of this teacher’s knowledge of geography? If so, what specific phrase does this?

play video icon Sample 1 - GEOG01


(b) Backdrop:
In this sample, the teacher engages the students in a wide ranging discussion about the cyclone (Nargis) which devastated southern Burma on 2nd May 2008. During a series of questions she establishes a broad social and political background which is relevant to the disaster. To what extent does she demonstrate comprehensive disciplinary knowledge and make connections with physical sciences, the social sciences and the humanities? How is this knowledge actually put into effect?

play video iconClick here to view this video sample


(c) Backdrop:
In this post-lesson interview, the teacher explains why he viewed the brainstorming lesson on the social, economic and environmental factors affecting Australia’s population growth, as achieving varying degrees of success. To what extent does he demonstrate comprehensive disciplinary knowledge? What population concepts does he use to make connections with physical sciences, the social sciences and the humanities?

play video iconClick here to view this video sample

Further links and resources

Description of geography:
“Geographers, geography educationalists and geography academics agree that geography should be seen as a holistic field of study as it bridges the social and biophysical sciences. This bridge also incorporates the analytical, critical and speculative methodologies from the humanities as students of geography examine the impact of space, place and systems on the human condition”
Sorensen, L. (2009) Literature Review - for the National Geography Curriculum. Geographical Education 22: 12

See also:
Berry, R. & Smith, R. (2009) Towards a national curriculum for Australia – Background Report. Brisbane: Australian Geography Teachers’ Association, Institute of Australian Geographers and Royal Geographical Society of Queensland.

Cresswell, T. (2008) Place: encountering geography as philosophy. Geography 93 (3): 132-9.

McInerney, M., Berg, K., Hutchinson, N., Maude, A. & Sorensen, L. (2009) Towards a national geography curriculum for Australia. Brisbane: Australian Geography Teachers’ Association, Institute of Australian Geographers and Royal Geographical Society of Queensland.

Morgan, J. & Lambert, D. (2005) Geography: Teaching school subjects 11-19. London: Routledge.

 
1. Knowing geography and geography curriculum
Accomplished geography teachers: 
2. Fostering geographical inquiry and fieldwork
Accomplished geography teachers:
3. Developing geographical thinking and communication
Accomplished geography teachers:
4. Understanding students and their communities
Accomplished geography teachers:
5. Establishing a safe, supportive and intellectually challenging learning environment

Accomplished geography teachers:


6. Understanding geography teaching – pedagogical practices
Accomplished geography teachers:
7. Planning, assessing and reporting

Accomplished geography teachers:


8. Progressing professional growth and development

Accomplished geography teachers:

9. Learning and working collegially

Accomplished geography teachers: